Tag: teen

So You Want to Ride a Motorcycle? What Teens Should Know

You’re a teen who wants a motorcycle license. How cool! It’s entirely possible for you to get your license, but first you should be aware of the fees, law,  and safety procedures involved in riding a motorcycle. Knowing what to expect can keep you safe and prevent surprise expenses from throwing you off your goal. Here are some things to keep in mind.

Classes Save Lives

According to Esurance, 90% of motorcycle accidents involve drivers who never took a motorcycle safety class. While taking a class doesn’t guarantee you’ll never be in a crash, or that other drivers will be safe, it can provide you with the knowledge that can keep you safe as possible. If you’re a minor, you may be required to take these classes. Taking safety courses has another bonus: you can save money on your insurance!

Crashes Are More Dangerous Than Car Crashes

You’re 35 times as likely to die from a motorcycle crash than a car accident. We’re not trying to scare anyone away from enjoying riding a motorcycle, but it’s the truth. You can seriously mitigate this risk by being knowledgeable and safe, which includes wearing a helmet at all times. Oh yeah, and take a class like we just mentioned : )

And Speed is a Factor

Super sport and sport motorcycles are popular because they’re sporty and speedy, but they’re also the type you’re most likely to crash on because of their light frames. It’s best to practice and own a motorcycle that’s more beginner-friendly until you’re more experienced.

But Protective Clothing Helps

If you’ve ever looked at a biker covered in leather on a hot summer day, you might have wondered “Why?”. While the thick layers might seem warm, they also add protection should you get into an accident. That gear might be the only thing that comes between you and the asphalt. At the very least, you should wear boots that go over your ankles, shatter-proof goggles, and gloves.

Not All Helmets Are the Same

Some helmets are more form than function. They’re small and light and don’t offer as much protection as helmets that are approved by the DOT. You’re only required to wear a helmet in 19 states, but you’re 40% more likely to die from a head injury if you don’t wear one, so you definitely don’t want to skimp here!

Owning a motorcycle seems fun, but it might be more dangerous than you realize. Knowing the rules and safety measures can prevent tragedy, but it’s also important to remember to ride safe and have fun.

Can I Go To Jail for Smoking Weed?

Every year, more states are voting to legalize Marijuana for either medical or recreational use. Canada legalized medical marijuana in 2001, and Trudeau has recently championed a bill to legalize recreational use. Seemingly everywhere in the Western world, it is becoming easier and easier to find places where one can purchase and consume cannabis legally.

That said, it is important to understand that existing laws are very strict, even in states where possession and use have been decriminalized. Laws vary from state to state (as well as in Canada), and there are some non-legal risks to consider as well. Do your homework before making a decision about whether to try marijuana. Here are a few things to consider.

Photo credit Vaping360.com (Vaping360)

Local Laws

It is important to know the law in any jurisdiction where you intend to smoke weed. In states where possession is still a criminal offense, a complaint by an individual that leads police to you can, and often will, result in criminal charges and possible jail time.

If it is your first offense or you are in possession of only a small amount of cannabis, a judge may only sentence you to time served. Some states, however, have mandatory minimum sentences for even nonviolent drug offenses that can put you away for months or even years. The best policy is to not light up at all anyplace where it is still considered a crime.

Possession

In many cases, evidence of smoking weed (being high or testing positive for THC) is not enough to land you in jail. If you happen to be high and run into a cop who detains you because he smells it, there is little that can be done to make charges stick if you aren’t carrying. That means, in most cases, you really don’t have to worry about just walking home from a friend’s house after a smoke session. If it’s out of sight and not on your person, jail is highly unlikely.

Being High In Public

If you are out and about creating a public nuisance as a result of being high, you can be arrested for public intoxication and spend at least a night in jail, just like you would if you were drunk in public. Since that’s not standard behavior for most stoners, it’s likely not something you would really need to worry about either.

Other Considerations

While it’s true that the health risks of cannabis use have been tremendously overstated in the past, it’s not true that the risks are negligible. It’s still a psychoactive drug, and heavy consumption can seriously affect users’ neurochemistry – particularly if those users are teenagers whose brains are still developing. The National Institutes of Health reports that marijuana abuse is associated with some level of physical and psychological dependency, contrary to popular belief. This is why legal consumption age has usually been set at 21, as the risk of developing dependencies goes down significantly after brain structures crystalize. Long-term effects can also include memory dysfunction and a decline in visuomotor skills. And similar to other intoxicants, chronic use can contribute to risk of mental illness later in life.

On the other hand, there is some evidence to suggest that mild cannabis use can help fight Glaucoma, reduce the incident of epileptic seizures, and has well-established benefits as a pain reliever. For most patients, cannabinoid pain relievers have a lower incidence of dependency than the opioids that currently saturate the market. And while smoking weed can irritate the lungs and exacerbate conditions like bronchitis and asthma, those effects are mild compared to those of – say – cigarettes.

In short, smoking weed does come with a degree of risk, particularly if you are underage or in a location where it is considered a criminal offense. And just because it’s legal doesn’t mean you should stock up and light up. MARIJUANA ABUSE CAN BE EXTREMELY HARMFUL! If, however, you know the laws in the jurisdiction where you live (or smoke), and play by all applicable rules when it comes to possession and use, possible incarceration for smoking weed is not likely to be a huge concern for you. But, there is so much more you can be doing with your time…so why get stoned in the first place?

References

Canada.ca

Governing.com

Harvard Health Publications

Mo Weed

National Institute of Health

NORML

What to Practice to Ace Your Driving Test

Learning how to drive is a milestone in most teenager’s lives. You may also be an adult looking to improve your skills and secure that first license too. To gain any license, you must practice driving on a regular basis. Get to know the skills you’ll need to practice in order to ace that driving test.

Pay Attention to Speed Limits

Speed-limit signs dot the roadway in various locations. You must always be aware of the posted limit so you can drive at a safe speed. Be aware that some signs are difficult to see or might be missing altogether. It’s your job to know if you’re driving in a residential, school, or industrial area. These areas have specific limits that are consistent in any city. With this speed-limit knowledge in mind, you’ll be able to pass your driving test even if the signs are difficult to see.


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Parallel-Parking Skills

The traditional parallel parking test is still part of the industry. You may not perform this maneuver on a daily basis, but it helps to have mastered the technique when you do need to slide between cars. Practice this skill with cones or other tall obstacles in an open, parking lot. Pull up to the cones as if they were the bumpers of two cars and maneuver the car into the space. Perform this activity numerous times until you can complete it without much thought.

Here is a video with some tips:

Merging with Style

Merging into traffic with every vehicle moving at a slightly different speed is a skill that must be practiced several times. It’s possible to avoid most accidents when you know which cars are close or far away. Many people have accidents because they simply forget to check their blind spots. Turn your head to see the cars around you because relying on your mirrors only gives you part of the story.

Stopping

Many people fail driving tests because they do not stop properly. Practice smooth braking, and make sure you come to a complete stop at all stop signs and red lights, even if you are making a right turn on red. you MUST come to a complete stop or you will fail! Stop with enough distance form the cars in front of you, or else you might be thought of as a tailgater — and FAIL.

Freeway Entrances and Exits

According to car accident attorneys, another accident-prone area involves freeway transitions. Learn to accelerate to the proper speed as you enter the freeway. Ideally, you should slide easily into traffic without causing other drivers to slow down or speed up. Practice freeway exits as well. You’ll need to slow down at a constant rate in order to stop neatly at the end of the pathway.

Most states require you to practice driving in both day and nighttime scenarios. Driving tests, however, don’t normally have a nighttime exam. Don’t overlook the nighttime skills because they’re just as important as daytime knowledge. Safe driving in any situation should be your goal.

Now go ace your driving test!