Category: Growing Up

What to Practice to Ace Your Driving Test

Learning how to drive is a milestone in most teenager’s lives. You may also be an adult looking to improve your skills and secure that first license too. To gain any license, you must practice driving on a regular basis. Get to know the skills you’ll need to practice in order to ace that driving test.

Pay Attention to Speed Limits

Speed-limit signs dot the roadway in various locations. You must always be aware of the posted limit so you can drive at a safe speed. Be aware that some signs are difficult to see or might be missing altogether. It’s your job to know if you’re driving in a residential, school, or industrial area. These areas have specific limits that are consistent in any city. With this speed-limit knowledge in mind, you’ll be able to pass your driving test even if the signs are difficult to see.


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Parallel-Parking Skills

The traditional parallel parking test is still part of the industry. You may not perform this maneuver on a daily basis, but it helps to have mastered the technique when you do need to slide between cars. Practice this skill with cones or other tall obstacles in an open, parking lot. Pull up to the cones as if they were the bumpers of two cars and maneuver the car into the space. Perform this activity numerous times until you can complete it without much thought.

Here is a video with some tips:

Merging with Style

Merging into traffic with every vehicle moving at a slightly different speed is a skill that must be practiced several times. It’s possible to avoid most accidents when you know which cars are close or far away. Many people have accidents because they simply forget to check their blind spots. Turn your head to see the cars around you because relying on your mirrors only gives you part of the story.

Stopping

Many people fail driving tests because they do not stop properly. Practice smooth braking, and make sure you come to a complete stop at all stop signs and red lights, even if you are making a right turn on red. you MUST come to a complete stop or you will fail! Stop with enough distance form the cars in front of you, or else you might be thought of as a tailgater — and FAIL.

Freeway Entrances and Exits

According to car accident attorneys, another accident-prone area involves freeway transitions. Learn to accelerate to the proper speed as you enter the freeway. Ideally, you should slide easily into traffic without causing other drivers to slow down or speed up. Practice freeway exits as well. You’ll need to slow down at a constant rate in order to stop neatly at the end of the pathway.

Most states require you to practice driving in both day and nighttime scenarios. Driving tests, however, don’t normally have a nighttime exam. Don’t overlook the nighttime skills because they’re just as important as daytime knowledge. Safe driving in any situation should be your goal.

Now go ace your driving test!

Tips For Making Better Choices Throughout High School

Adolescence is a challenging and confusing time of life that often leads to bad decision making. Many factors contribute to this including peer pressure, the need to achieve good grades and added responsibilities. Use these tips to help make better choices as you journey through your high school career in order to achieve greater success in higher education, as well as in adulthood.

Be Careful With Social Media Posts

Think twice before posting on any social media portals, especially if these posts contain pictures related to alcohol, drugs, sex, guns or contain vulgar language. This can affect your ability to be gainfully employed in the future. In fact, statistics reveal that over 90% of recruitment agencies investigate social media posts before placing prospective candidates.

Your future employer is not interested in your privacy or whether you were just having some fun. They will make use of the public nature of the internet to help determine whether you are of the character and dignity of a person they would like their business associated with. It is best to avoid any posts that may be considered to be embarrassing by a future employer.

Also keep in mind that social media posts have a way of going viral, even if you aren’t the one who created the original post or shared it. There are dozens of stories on the internet about individuals who lost their jobs and are now finding it difficult to be employed due to dodgy social media posts that were submitted years ago. So it’s best to behave in a manner that doesn’t attract posting from peers.

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Your Grades Matter

The pressure from parents, teachers and even peers is greater than ever to achieve good grades. This pressure, no matter how challenging to deal with, is however justified. Your grades can influence your ability to get into a good college, receive a scholarship and could affect your future employment.

The need for self-expression and finding individuality has led to the general belief that your grades don’t define you. While this may be true to a certain extent, your grades are still important, relative to how they may impact your future.

Even if you feel that the grading system is outdated and flawed, the numbers still matter at the end of the day. Especially to prospective colleges and employers who tend to be old-fashioned in their approach for selecting candidates.

Work hard at achieving the best grades you are able and maintaining these grades. You don’t always have to be a straight-A student, but must always show an effort at doing your best.

However, it is important to recognize other factors that could affect your future and not let the need to achieve affect these or your overall quality of life. The pressure and stress of being the top of your class should never affect your ability to enjoy the full high school experience.

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You Can Say No

We are all taught from a young age to be amiable and agreeable which is a good skill to develop. However, you should never feel obligated or pressured into saying “yes,” whether this pressure is being applied by parents, teachers, peers or any other person. Saying “yes” when you should have said “no” is the greatest factor that influences bad choices.

Legislation and your parents provide you with laws and rules to follow that should dictate what is acceptable and suitable for you to do at your specific age. But at the end of the day, it is up to you to make the decisions that will affect your future when no one is watching. Always keep in mind these laws and rules, most were created to protect you. Never be afraid to say “no” if you feel that entering into a certain activity is wrong.

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Protect Your Identity

Identity theft is a part of modern life that people of all ages need to learn protect themselves against. Teenagers and young adults often think that they are not targets for this type of crime. Having your personal information available to criminals may result in criminal activity that may be associated with you.

In fact, teens make great targets for identity theft due to the time they spend on unsecured networks and their tendency to leave electronic devices accessible to others and unprotected.

Just a few basic security measures can prevent this from happening to you.

  • Keep your electronic devices on your person or locked away at all times.
  • Make sure that all your devices, computers and laptops are password protected. Choose a complicated password and never share it with anyone.
  • Log out of your personal accounts, including email after use.
  • Never leave documents containing account information or your social security number where others may have access.
  • Pay attention to any activity on your accounts that you did not perform.

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Learning to make good decisions in high school will set you up to make even better decisions as you move into adulthood. Never underestimate the impact that one small mistake or bad decision can have on your future. If in doubt, sleep on a decision or find a mentor or person whose advice you trust and talk to them before making a choice. School is a place of learning and you should take this time to educate yourself in all aspects of life, including how to make better choices.


Beatrice Quany is the Marketing Director for ILoveCopperJewelry.com, a website displaying unique creations by award winning designer John S. Brana. Visit the site to view their stylish collection of beautiful copper jewelry.

Dear High School Self

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Dear High School Self,

Hello my friend. I see you will be graduating in the spring. You’ve had trials, drama and success the last few years. I know you still aren’t quite sure where you fit or what part you will play in life. Be patient, it will reveal itself along the way. It has been and will be worth all the effort you have and are making. Sometimes we race through the finish line with fanfare and cheers. Other times we seem to barely survive and crawl across. ‘HOW’ you finish matters a lot less than ‘THAT YOU FINISH’. Keep giving it all you’ve got and you’ll get somewhere worth being.

I know you have often wondered if you have what it takes to become something more than you are right now, or if there is even anything ‘more’ out there. Trust me, you can do it. I know now that you will never be alone, especially on those long dark roads you have and will be required to travel.

Treasure the remaining few months of High School. Don’t allow what you don’t have to rob you of what you do have. Attitude and what you choose to dwell on make a difference. Don’t allow the ‘can’t do, so don’t try’ people to control your life. There are great things out there for you to accomplish and wonderful people to meet. Keep yourself in the game so you can be on the field when the really interesting stuff happens.

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You think you’ve done some cool stuff. You will always remember your experiences in football, swimming and music fondly. Having such passion and endeavors has kept you on your feet. I know you are planning to swim in college. You will have a great experience. It may not last long but will help set a pattern you will follow all your life. Never hesitate to go for your dreams or try to accomplish really hard things. Strength and learning are more often found in the path and the effort rather than in the end result.

Hold on and continue to develop that growing faith in the divine. It will become a solid foundation during some of the storms that lay ahead. Yet it will also allow the sun to shine all the brighter each day. He is there for you too.

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My young friend, I stand at the other end of the path looking back over 43 years with a measure of envy. I am happy that you have so much in front of you. Life is a wonderful adventure and will take you amazing places. I see clearly the events that separate us and with some insight can say that who I have become is due to all the experiences combined. We don’t get to skip over the rough spots and shouldn’t want to. For it is all the good and the bad, the success and the failure, the joy and the sorrow, things lost and things found that blend together to give our lives depth, color and meaning. I see more clearly the meaning of your life and it has been worth it. All these experiences make it possible for us to become the wonderful and interesting people that God intended. One day you will see, to live…truly live, love and aspire to be something more…is glorious.

What more can I say? Thank you for making me who I am. As a result of all that has happened, I have found joy and meaning, you will too. I believe in you.

Your Friend,
Clark


The above was written by award winning YA author, Clark Burbidge, about what he wishes he could have told his teenage self. He is the writer of the fiction trilogies, “Giants in the Land” and “Star Passage”.

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Fight Back Against Bullies with Krav Maga Expert Jarrett Arthur

Are we teaching teens and kids to become a nation of victims that cannot stand up for themselves? That’s one question we posed to Krav Maga instructor Jarrett Arthur, creator of the M.A.M.A. self defense system.

Arthur provides some practical communication tips for dealing with bullies, and also covers some awesome self-defense techniques to use when things go wrong and bullies physically attack. For more info go to http://jarrettarthur.com

Five Surprising Things You Have in Common with Celebrities

The following is a guest post by Mandy Wilkins.

Alright, we admit it: we’re obsessed with celebrities. Whether they’re strutting down the red carpet or gracing the front of magazine covers, we like to follow their every move. But, once we
strip away all their glitter, money, and fame, it turns out that celebrities are just like us. They share our same fears, aspirations, and challenges. Here’s a list of five surprising things you have
in common with your fave A-Listers:

celebrity1. Body Insecurity

How many times have you looked at the cover of a magazine, seeing a celeb in a crop top and tight jeans, wishing you had her body? It may come as a surprise that nearly all celebrities have struggled with the same body insecurity as you do. Even Beyonce doesn’t wake up flawless every single morning.

Demi Lovato admitted back in 2010 that she struggled with anorexia and bulimia because of severe issues with her body image. After years of dealing with her insecurities, she told Seventeen, “I have come to realize that making yourself happy is most important.”

2. Being Rejected­

Has that cute boy in front of you, that so­-called “popular” group, or even the job you wanted, ever completely rejected you? You’re not alone — in fact, it’s happened to seemingly perfect celebrities. A now­-famous television host was fired from her first job as a television reporter because she was “unfit for TV.” I bet Oprah Winfrey is laughing at that Baltimore station today. Even the iconic Marilyn Monroe was told by modeling agencies that she should consider becoming a secretary.

Next time you’re rejected, focus on your strengths, how you can improve, and remember: you could be the next Oprah.

3. Problems Fitting In

­ Whether you’re a self­-proclaimed “geek” or a self-­assured jock, all of us have had insecurities about fitting in. Even Zac Efron claims that “growing up was hell” thanks to his “uncool” interest in musical theater. But, that interest is what landed his gig in High School Musical – and his status as a heartthrob.

Singer Taylor Swift has never fit in with her young musical counterparts; instead of going clubbing or turning to drugs, she has maintained a wholesome image—and several platinum albums.

More often than not, walking to the beat of your own drum is way better than “fitting in.” Who needs to conform?

4. Work/Life Balance Issues

Going to school every single day and then trying to maintain an actual social life is hard enough. Can you imagine having to balance work and life while the paparazzi track your every move?

Yikes.

Some celebs utterly fail in this department, having their personal lives blow up alongside their work (Lindsay Lohan, anyone?) But other celebs, like Angelina Jolie, seem to juggle it all seamlessly. Superwoman somehow manages to have six kids, an amazing acting career, and a commitment to charity.

According to life coach Jasmin Terrany, finding a balance can be done by focusing on what’s important, deep breathing, and leaving some time to relax.

5. Relationship Insecurity

Trying to date a normal human being that makes you feel good about yourself is hard enough – can you imagine trying to do that in front of cameras?

While some celebrities have excelled at finding a normal relationship under the stress of Hollywood (Ben & Jen), others have crashed and burned thanks to disloyalty (Kristen Stewart), lack of mutual respect (Justin & Selena), and who-­the-­heck-­knows-­what (Miley & Liam). But whether we’re making $7 billion a year or $7 an hour at the movie theater, we all want the same thing out of a relationship: someone who understands, appreciates, and supports us.

Mandy Wilkins is a recent graduate from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in English with a concentration in Creative Writing. She now resides in Atlanta, where she writes about everything from pop culture to children’s literature. This January, she’ll be moving to southeast Asia to teach English

How to Break Up With Mark Zuckerberg (and Other Social Media Stalkers)

Guest Post by Emma Fuller, Omlet

At first, Mark seemed like the perfect guy:  He “shared” regularly, “checked in” often, kept you “fed” with the latest news, and paid attention to what you “liked.”

But before you knew it, Mark began to change:  He invaded your privacy, started keeping tabs on everything you did, he manipulated you, and even gave your secrets away to all of his friends. That’s crazy glue! If a guy did that to you IRL, you would kick him to the curb.

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I thought it would be fun to think about our relationship with Facebook like a relationship with a boyfriend. What makes a good relationship, what makes a bad relationship, and how does Mark measure up? For me, the biggest thing is trust. Can I trust someone with my deepest secrets? Can I trust them not to betray me, and share my most private things with other people?

My relationship status with Facebook (in Mark’s own words): “It’s Complicated.” Why? Deleting Facebook sounds great, but is it really practical? No, I don’t think it is. The problem isn’t just Facebook, it’s us. We’ve chosen to be in this relationship, and to share all our personal info with them. We need to start making better choices when it comes to what we share, and how often we share.

Think of it this way: Would you share your diary with the world? I know I wouldn’t even share it with my best friend. All your data adds up, and even if you think your sharing a little, they know a lot about you. Pandora can tell with 80% accuracy what your political leanings are just off the music you listen to!

So how do you set boundaries between you and Facebook?

>>  STEP #1:  Don’t Wait By the Phone

Turn off mobile notifications so that Mark doesn’t message you throughout the day.  Browse and post on Facebook only when it’s convenient for you.

>>  STEP #2:  Limit your “Liking” habit?

Facebook sells your likes and interests to advertisers so that they can specifically target YOU.  I might see an ad on Facebook that is targeted towards 20-25 year old females who like Buzzfeed and the San Francisco 49er’s. We spend time carefully choosing what to like to make our profiles look good to our friends, but rarely do our friends check over it. Facebook encourages this habit so that they have more information to sell.

>>  STEP #3:  Only Post the Big Stuff

Post a photo or two here and there, say “Happy Birthday” to a friend, RSVP to an event, and then LOG OFF.

>>  STEP #4: Only Trust Yourself with Your Data

There are other options for your more personal conversations, whether they be serious, or you just want to share all those photos from the concert you went to last week with your friends. Options that respect you and don’t sell your data.

For example, there’s Omlet a super fun, easy and social chat app that lets you easily message friends, share photos, post videos, and express yourself without Mark or anyone looking over your shoulder. With Omlet you’re as safe as you can be while still keeping in touch with all your friends. It’s your data, you should be able to control it AND still have a fun conversations with your friends and family.

[Note to teens: this guest post was written by someone from Omlet…we are running it because its kind of cute but it is intended as promo and you should keep that in mind]

Stop Bullying – One Teen’s Story

We reached out to teenage anti-bully crusader Rebecca Parkin, from England, to write a piece for us on her experiences and to talk to a few adults about the subject. Here is her article:


bully stopLiving in a society is very hard for everyone. However sometimes people take being ‘normal’ too seriously and bully or harass those who are different or unique. My mission in life is to make my community and those around me bully-free. Not only do I want to create this positive atmosphere around me; I want to inspire people from all walks of life from all over the world. When I was younger I was always the odd girl out. Everyone fit into these cliques, except me. I was the outsider, the one that didn’t fit in, but stood out.

I spoke to several people about their thoughts on Bullying.

  • David Nicholson, a youth patron for Ambitious about Autism said; “from personal experience, bullying can have a detrimental impact on mental health, confidence and self-esteem. I was bullied at school and it made me lose confidence. I wasn’t happy. Bullying is unacceptable and we need to stamp it out.” David was different from the other pupils at his school and they used that against him. Nobody deserves to get bullied, not now not ever.
  • Claire Ryan, a parent patron for Ambitious about Autism said; “Talk to someone, get help and support as soon as possible. You don’t have to deal with it alone.” I totally agree here, victims of bullying really need to speak out. Never hide what’s happening even if a bully has threatened you if you do tell anybody; the bully is only saying this because they are scared that others will find out what they are doing, and honestly it is very shameful.
  • Eva Firios, a talent agent and actress from Colorado said “It’s really bad here and the parents of the child who is the bully don’t care and they stand up for their child, saying it his or her right to do so.” This was one statement that I found most disheartening. How some parents agree to let their child continue this awful and damaging behaviour is beyond me. Parents need to understand what’s actually happening because of bullying: there’s more suicides, more depression…what happened to loving each other and compassion?
  • Michael Hering, CEO and President of LodoCinema, during a conversation I had with him about bullying, told me, “One of the biggest problems about bullying is that it causes a decrease in the quality of life by both parties. Bullying is an act of hate — plain and simple. I think the issue goes further than the obstruction of a happy healthy mental attitude of the individual getting bullied. The real issue is the culture and society the bully is influenced by. If we can unlock the root causes that create the need to bully, we can begin to make steps towards a better society.” This is true. We need to educate our children to love one another and show compassion. Parents need to take responsibility too,.If a child is being hateful you need to find out why. Have they learnt it from you? Is something negative happening in their lives they need help with? Are they depressed? All things that need investigating.

bully girlsThe people above are doing great things in the world and understand bullying and the effects it causes with not only young people, but adults too.

I was a victim of bullying, I have Autism and I was labelled the “weird” or “strange” girl in school. I may have been different in some ways, but I still wanted the same things from life; love, happiness and compassion. Because of my Autism I found it extremely difficult to socialise with others my age, as my brain worked in a slightly different way from my peers.

During my younger years I constantly moved schools due to lack of understanding from the educators and my peers. I went to five primary schools and I’ve been to two high schools. At my old high school, teachers would mock me in class in front of other pupils who bullied and harassed me outside of the classroom. There were young people who threatened me online and physically beat me up in school because they wanted to ‘show off’ and look good in front of their friends. I had no friends. I had nobody to turn to during these times.

However I had one supportive teacher who I still have to thank today for helping me during those years. I wouldn’t have made it without her. She spoke to the people who were bullying me because my head of year [in Britain, the teacher in charge of all the students in a particular year in school].didn’t do anything. She was like a friend, someone who cared about me. There was a time when I was afraid of being in school, unaware of what could happen. There were days when I didn’t know what to do and I didn’t want to continue fighting.

The other thing that helped me through was my faith in God. I turned to my religion when I needed help. I prayed and prayed and God answered and he guided me through this life and that’s the reason I’m here today. I have to say that Demi Lovato, my idol was also a major contributing factor to the reason I began to fight — the reason I wanted to follow my heart and show that I have a lot to offer and I’m not just that girl who’s kind of weird and different, but I’m a girl who can change, inspire and influence other people’s lives.

I’m very blessed to have the opportunity to say that I finally made it, it took a while but I’m through the other side and I can’t wait to continue on my journey.

I want every single young boy or girl who’s currently a victim of bullying to know that one day you will make your mark on this world and everyone will follow your footsteps, because you’re the ones that stand out, the ones people are envious and curious about. Just believe and let your heart go wild and never ever stop dreaming!


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I’m 16 years old and I’m an Anti-bullying Activist, I was bullied when I was younger and this is a subject I am very passionate about, I want to help young people understand and realize there is nothing to be ashamed of and things do get better. I’m a Young Journalist for ChildLine, I write their column in First News. I am a Youth Patron for Ambitious About Autism and I represent the charity internally and externally. I am a member of Rotherham’s Youth Cabinet representing young people’s voice in our community.

I do singing, acting and public speaking in my spare time. I love to express myself using the voice I’ve been blessed with.

You can find me on:

Twitter: Twitter.com/RebeccaAParkin
Facebook: Facebook.com/TheRealRebeccaParkin
My Campaign:Facebook.com/BreathingOurOwnThoughts
YouTube:YouTube.com/TheRealRebeccaParkin